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Renzo Giust
I Dainese Me
Nico Cereghini
Italian Legendary Tour
Gary Inman
 
 
 
 
 
 

USA ROAD TRIP, DAY 14 AND 15

16 October 2012 | News

by Gary Inman

Day 14: Grand Canyon, AZ to Chama, New Mexico
Day 15: Chama new Mexico to Amarillo, TX

While I had all the kit for riding 13,000km (8000 miles) in three weeks- new Dainese Gator Evo Gore-Tex suit, old Dainese gloves and new Dainese Torq Tour Gore-Tex boots (the best riding boots I’ve ever worn) - I’d sorely under-prepared when it came to five nights camping scheduled for this trip. Instead of the air mattress everyone else had packed I had a cheap foam rollmat. I was used to nice, lush European ground, not the bare, cold, high altitude campsites of North America. I’d already chickened out of one night and stayed in a hotel (-6 degrees C didn’t sound appealing).

So, it was no surprise I didn’t get a good night’s sleep in the Grand Canyon campground. It was more of a relief than a problem to rise at 4.30am to ride the few miles to the South Rim to watch the sunrise.

After seeing the sun paint the valley a thousand shades of brown, there was a big day of riding ahead. Along the rim of the Grand Canyon, out of Arizona, through the Painted Desert, into the Navajo Nation, through Monument Valley and into New Mexico.

The buttes of Monument Valley are still beautiful and mesmerising despite feeling like I’ve seen them a thousand times in adverts and photographs. The road, as straight an arrow, bisects the red desert and heads towards Four Corners, where Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Arizona meet at a geometrically neat point.

After the heat of the desert, the last hour or riding in the cold and dark dragged. I was riding with the tour organiser, Nick Sanders, Ian on his old Triumph, Stewart on another Super Tenéré and the newlyweds, Alex and Jenny on their KTM Adventure. Speeds rose. All we wanted was a hot shower and hot food. We got it in the tiny town of Chama, New Mexico. The best steak of the trip.

The next day was split into two halves. The first was on the two-lanes of New Mexico, where we saw huge tarantulas crossing the road; the second half was 250km on the I-40 interstate, directly west into Northern Texas and the overnight stop in Amarillo, Texas.

Gary is riding from New York to California and back to New York with www.nicksanders.com

by Gary Inman

Day 14: Grand Canyon, AZ to Chama, New Mexico
Day 15: Chama new Mexico to Amarillo, TX

While I had all the kit for riding 13,000km (8000 miles) in three weeks- new Dainese Gator Evo Gore-Tex suit, old Dainese gloves and new Dainese Torq Tour Gore-Tex boots (the best riding boots I’ve ever worn) - I’d sorely under-prepared when it came to five nights camping scheduled for this trip. Instead of the air mattress everyone else had packed I had a cheap foam rollmat. I was used to nice, lush European ground, not the bare, cold, high altitude campsites of North America. I’d already chickened out of one night and stayed in a hotel (-6 degrees C didn’t sound appealing).

So, it was no surprise I didn’t get a good night’s sleep in the Grand Canyon campground. It was more of a relief than a problem to rise at 4.30am to ride the few miles to the South Rim to watch the sunrise.

After seeing the sun paint the valley a thousand shades of brown, there was a big day of riding ahead. Along the rim of the Grand Canyon, out of Arizona, through the Painted Desert, into the Navajo Nation, through Monument Valley and into New Mexico.

The buttes of Monument Valley are still beautiful and mesmerising despite feeling like I’ve seen them a thousand times in adverts and photographs. The road, as straight an arrow, bisects the red desert and heads towards Four Corners, where Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Arizona meet at a geometrically neat point.

After the heat of the desert, the last hour or riding in the cold and dark dragged. I was riding with the tour organiser, Nick Sanders, Ian on his old Triumph, Stewart on another Super Tenéré and the newlyweds, Alex and Jenny on their KTM Adventure. Speeds rose. All we wanted was a hot shower and hot food. We got it in the tiny town of Chama, New Mexico. The best steak of the trip.

The next day was split into two halves. The first was on the two-lanes of New Mexico, where we saw huge tarantulas crossing the road; the second half was 250km on the I-40 interstate, directly west into Northern Texas and the overnight stop in Amarillo, Texas.

Gary is riding from New York to California and back to New York with www.nicksanders.com

Read more

 
 
 
 
 
 

USA ROAD TRIP, DAY 6, 7 AND 8

01 October 2012 | News

by Gary Inman

Day 6: Hill City, SD to Yellowstone Park, WY

What do you know about Wyoming? If you’re the same as me, nothing. The state capital is Cheyenne. The whole population is little more than 60,000 – a decent Serie A or Premiership football crowd, but the news is, from a motorcycling point of view, the roads are amazing.

I’d only heard about the Beartooth Pass, for the first time, two days before arriving in the Cowboy state. One of my friends in Des Moines mentioned it. Two of the guys in the group I was riding with had been told about it too, so we made a detour, from South Dakota, over Wyoming’s fantastic Bighorn Pass, down to Redhorn, Montana and the start of the Beartooth. This mountain pass has been called the most beautiful road in the USA.

The pass climbs from about 1600m to 2400m in 19km (that’s 5200ft to 8000ft in 12 miles). In crosses into Wyoming, then back into Montana, before ending near the north-east entrance of Yellowstone. The highest point is 3337m (10.947ft), with glaciers at the road side.

I reckon the Bighorn is a better ride, thanks to gorgeous sweepers, but the Beartooth is mind-blowing. We spent so long on the mountain we had to race through Yellowstone, past the mean looking buffalo, to put our tents up before dark.

*******

Day 7: Yellowstone Park, WY to Logan, UT
Day 8: Logan, UT
to Salt Lake City, UT

It sounded so romantic, camping in Yellowstone National Park. The outdoors dream. When we arrived at the entrance to the campground, the rangers warned us to not even leave a bottle of water in camp, in case it attracted bears. What, I wondered, they can smell water through plastic? Anyway, we did what we were told, then huddled round the campfire, told stories and drank weak beer.

The sky was so clear we could see the Milky Way.

After a couple of hours I crawled into my sleeping bag and was asleep in minutes. Then the temperature plummeted. I wasn’t prepared for -2 degrees C. I woke up every hour to put on more clothes and try to get comfortable on the rough ground. I endunded up wearing my Dainese Gator Evo Gore-Tex jacket.

Very few people slept well and when Ian, who I’d ridden with the day before said he was riding towards Salt Lake City and getting a cheap room for the night, I decided to join him.

Ian, on a 1998 Triumph Sprint, and I rode out of Yellowstone, through the bottom of Wyoming, a little of Idaho, then into Utah. Another incredible day’s riding with a great motel at the end of the day. Those who stayed to camp for the second night had to suffer temperatures of -6.

The next morning we rode the 80 miles to Salt Lake City to have oil and tyres changes. Both the Super Tenérés tyres should have been changed 3000km before. The new rubber transformed the bike.

Again, I split from the group for the night this time to visit a young custom bike builder, based in SLC, called Andy Carter of Pangea Speed (http://www.pangeaspeed.com). I checked out his workshop, the great cast and fabricated parts he makes, his turbo Harley Evo chopper, then went into Salt Lake’s city centre for a pizza and one of his friends fantastic restaurants, Este. This is what road tripping is all about.

Gary is riding from New York to California and back to New York with www.nicksanders.com

by Gary Inman

Day 6: Hill City, SD to Yellowstone Park, WY

What do you know about Wyoming? If you’re the same as me, nothing. The state capital is Cheyenne. The whole population is little more than 60,000 – a decent Serie A or Premiership football crowd, but the news is, from a motorcycling point of view, the roads are amazing.

I’d only heard about the Beartooth Pass, for the first time, two days before arriving in the Cowboy state. One of my friends in Des Moines mentioned it. Two of the guys in the group I was riding with had been told about it too, so we made a detour, from South Dakota, over Wyoming’s fantastic Bighorn Pass, down to Redhorn, Montana and the start of the Beartooth. This mountain pass has been called the most beautiful road in the USA.

The pass climbs from about 1600m to 2400m in 19km (that’s 5200ft to 8000ft in 12 miles). In crosses into Wyoming, then back into Montana, before ending near the north-east entrance of Yellowstone. The highest point is 3337m (10.947ft), with glaciers at the road side.

I reckon the Bighorn is a better ride, thanks to gorgeous sweepers, but the Beartooth is mind-blowing. We spent so long on the mountain we had to race through Yellowstone, past the mean looking buffalo, to put our tents up before dark.

*******

Day 7: Yellowstone Park, WY to Logan, UT
Day 8: Logan, UT
to Salt Lake City, UT

It sounded so romantic, camping in Yellowstone National Park. The outdoors dream. When we arrived at the entrance to the campground, the rangers warned us to not even leave a bottle of water in camp, in case it attracted bears. What, I wondered, they can smell water through plastic? Anyway, we did what we were told, then huddled round the campfire, told stories and drank weak beer.

The sky was so clear we could see the Milky Way.

After a couple of hours I crawled into my sleeping bag and was asleep in minutes. Then the temperature plummeted. I wasn’t prepared for -2 degrees C. I woke up every hour to put on more clothes and try to get comfortable on the rough ground. I endunded up wearing my Dainese Gator Evo Gore-Tex jacket.

Very few people slept well and when Ian, who I’d ridden with the day before said he was riding towards Salt Lake City and getting a cheap room for the night, I decided to join him.

Ian, on a 1998 Triumph Sprint, and I rode out of Yellowstone, through the bottom of Wyoming, a little of Idaho, then into Utah. Another incredible day’s riding with a great motel at the end of the day. Those who stayed to camp for the second night had to suffer temperatures of -6.

The next morning we rode the 80 miles to Salt Lake City to have oil and tyres changes. Both the Super Tenérés tyres should have been changed 3000km before. The new rubber transformed the bike.

Again, I split from the group for the night this time to visit a young custom bike builder, based in SLC, called Andy Carter of Pangea Speed (http://www.pangeaspeed.com). I checked out his workshop, the great cast and fabricated parts he makes, his turbo Harley Evo chopper, then went into Salt Lake’s city centre for a pizza and one of his friends fantastic restaurants, Este. This is what road tripping is all about.

Gary is riding from New York to California and back to New York with www.nicksanders.com

Read more