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Renzo Giust
I Dainese Me
Nico Cereghini
Italian Legendary Tour
Gary Inman
 
 
 
 
 
 

USA TRIP ROAD, DAY 9 AND 10

02 October 2012 | News

by Gary Inman

Day 9: Salt Lake City, UT to Sparks, NV
Day 10: Sparks, NC, to Santa Cruz, CA

We’re out of Salt Lake City at the crack of dawn. Every day is a 650km now. The route passes the Great Salt Lake and directly east till we skirt Bonneville Salt Flats. I’ve been to this historic, evocative place twice before, when the cars and bikes are here to have their necks wrung, so I don’t need to turn off to investigate it today. Rather than continue on the boring Interstate for the rest of the day, I turn off at Wendover, the nearest town to the Salt Flats and head on a loop down Highway 50. This road was given the title ‘America’s Loneliest Road’ a few years ago. I don’t know if it was intentional, but it was great marketing for the towns along it, because, it seems, motorcyclists immediately wanted to tour the lonesome route. So, on this Saturday morning, it was busy with all kinds of bikes. And hot. Hotter than hell. Lone cyclists torture themselves along it this morning. And a couple on a tandem, with legs the colour of roast beef. The towns are spread as much as 160km (100 miles) apart on this route, and it runs through a high altitude desert. It’s not easy riding a motorcycle along it, I can’t imagine wanted to pedal a cycle through it. After a night in a two-bit casino town, I leave for the coast and a stunning ride up the Interstate 80, surely America’s most beautiful motorway. It climbs into the pine-covered mountains of Donner Memorial Park, where a group of 19th Centurty pioneers, travelling from Missouri to California were trapped by the snow (if you fancy some grim reading, google ‘Donner party’).

When the road begins to dip to the coast, a Sunday drive of hot rods and kustoms share the freeway.

We continue done to Marin county and exculsive Sausalito directly to the north of the Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco. I’ve ridden from Atlantic to Pacific. The first half of the trip is over. Or it will be after 60 miles of the Pacific Coast Highway. Now it’s time to start heading east.

Gary is riding from New York to California and back to New York with www.nicksanders.com

by Gary Inman

Day 9: Salt Lake City, UT to Sparks, NV
Day 10: Sparks, NC, to Santa Cruz, CA

We’re out of Salt Lake City at the crack of dawn. Every day is a 650km now. The route passes the Great Salt Lake and directly east till we skirt Bonneville Salt Flats. I’ve been to this historic, evocative place twice before, when the cars and bikes are here to have their necks wrung, so I don’t need to turn off to investigate it today. Rather than continue on the boring Interstate for the rest of the day, I turn off at Wendover, the nearest town to the Salt Flats and head on a loop down Highway 50. This road was given the title ‘America’s Loneliest Road’ a few years ago. I don’t know if it was intentional, but it was great marketing for the towns along it, because, it seems, motorcyclists immediately wanted to tour the lonesome route. So, on this Saturday morning, it was busy with all kinds of bikes. And hot. Hotter than hell. Lone cyclists torture themselves along it this morning. And a couple on a tandem, with legs the colour of roast beef. The towns are spread as much as 160km (100 miles) apart on this route, and it runs through a high altitude desert. It’s not easy riding a motorcycle along it, I can’t imagine wanted to pedal a cycle through it. After a night in a two-bit casino town, I leave for the coast and a stunning ride up the Interstate 80, surely America’s most beautiful motorway. It climbs into the pine-covered mountains of Donner Memorial Park, where a group of 19th Centurty pioneers, travelling from Missouri to California were trapped by the snow (if you fancy some grim reading, google ‘Donner party’).

When the road begins to dip to the coast, a Sunday drive of hot rods and kustoms share the freeway.

We continue done to Marin county and exculsive Sausalito directly to the north of the Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco. I’ve ridden from Atlantic to Pacific. The first half of the trip is over. Or it will be after 60 miles of the Pacific Coast Highway. Now it’s time to start heading east.

Gary is riding from New York to California and back to New York with www.nicksanders.com

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USA ROAD TRIP, DAY 4 AND 5

18 September 2012 | News

by Gary Inman

Day 4: Des Moines, IA to Winner, SD
Day 5: Winner SD to Hill City, SD

The day starts two hours later than I wanted it to. Late night, a comfortable bed and no alarm call means I’m packing in a panic. This will be the second day I’ve split from the group I’m riding most of this 21-day tour with and I don’t want to be arriving hours behind them.
Des Moines is a handsome city, but I need to get back on the road. Following my Garmin’s advice, I jump on the Interstate, but after nearly 1000km on the motorway yesterday I can’t stand any more of it and leave to cut diagonally across Iowa’s farm country.
It’s on this route I start seeing the quiet Midwest towns with wide avenues, 1930s, and earlier, brick-built civic buildings that are now boarded up.
It’s also on these roads I start seeing, and smelling dead skunks. The odour is so bad I start holding my breath when I see one ahead.
The day’s riding on my own is great. I’ve got faith in the reliability of the Yamaha, I’m listening to music in my headphones and the Garmin is letting me navigate around when I get bored of the road I’m on. The only downside to the day is staying in Winner, South Dakota. Not a great place to visit.
The next day I stick with a group for the first 80 miles, riding west on dead straight two-lane. The first petrol stop takes forever, so I set off on my own again, aiming for Wounded Knee. This historical site is on an Indian reservation, and is remembered for a massacre of Native American men, women and children in December 1890.
From there it’s into the Badlands National Park and on to the Harley-Davidson riders’ Mecca, Sturgis. Before this trip I didn’t know much about South Dakota, but the roads here are amazing and the scenery so varied, for the moonscapes of the Badlands to the pine-covered Black Hills.
After dropping off my luggage at the Lodge I ride out to Mount Rushmore to see the carved presidents faces to end an amazing 650km (400 mile) day.

Gary is riding from New York to California and back to New York with www.nicksanders.com

by Gary Inman

Day 4: Des Moines, IA to Winner, SD
Day 5: Winner SD to Hill City, SD

The day starts two hours later than I wanted it to. Late night, a comfortable bed and no alarm call means I’m packing in a panic. This will be the second day I’ve split from the group I’m riding most of this 21-day tour with and I don’t want to be arriving hours behind them.
Des Moines is a handsome city, but I need to get back on the road. Following my Garmin’s advice, I jump on the Interstate, but after nearly 1000km on the motorway yesterday I can’t stand any more of it and leave to cut diagonally across Iowa’s farm country.
It’s on this route I start seeing the quiet Midwest towns with wide avenues, 1930s, and earlier, brick-built civic buildings that are now boarded up.
It’s also on these roads I start seeing, and smelling dead skunks. The odour is so bad I start holding my breath when I see one ahead.
The day’s riding on my own is great. I’ve got faith in the reliability of the Yamaha, I’m listening to music in my headphones and the Garmin is letting me navigate around when I get bored of the road I’m on. The only downside to the day is staying in Winner, South Dakota. Not a great place to visit.
The next day I stick with a group for the first 80 miles, riding west on dead straight two-lane. The first petrol stop takes forever, so I set off on my own again, aiming for Wounded Knee. This historical site is on an Indian reservation, and is remembered for a massacre of Native American men, women and children in December 1890.
From there it’s into the Badlands National Park and on to the Harley-Davidson riders’ Mecca, Sturgis. Before this trip I didn’t know much about South Dakota, but the roads here are amazing and the scenery so varied, for the moonscapes of the Badlands to the pine-covered Black Hills.
After dropping off my luggage at the Lodge I ride out to Mount Rushmore to see the carved presidents faces to end an amazing 650km (400 mile) day.

Gary is riding from New York to California and back to New York with www.nicksanders.com

Read more

 
 
 
 
 
 

GUY MARTIN WINS AT OLIVERS MOUNT

17 September 2012 | News

by Gary Inman

After missing last year’s Scarborough Gold Cup due to complications caused by blood poisoning, Guy Martin returned to record his eighth Gold Cup win at the road circuit in the North of England. This comes off the back of winning last month’s Ulster GP. The turn in fortune, after disappointment at the Northwest 200 and Isle of Man TT, is said to be down to new tyre compounds coming from the Tyco TAS Suzuki team’s suppliers, Pirelli.

Guy beat Isle of Man legend John McGuinness and other leading roads specialists, including TT winners, Michael Dunlop and Bruce Anstey, on his way to five wins from six starts over the two-day race meeting. Only an electrical glitch, in a Supersport race he was leading, stopped him from claiming a 100% record.

It’s been a great day and nice to get my hands back on the Gold Cup for the eighth time,” said Guy. “I enjoyed the battle with McGuinness and co. for the win, which made it that little bit more special, and to give Tyco Suzuki their first win here is mint. The boys always put in a big effort for me so they really deserve it. We almost, almost, had the clean sweep only for what I believe to be a tilt switch problem that caused the bike to cut out in the last race. She was grand when I got her back up onto the fat of the tyre, but it was too risky to take a chance with it. We’ll be happy with our lot: five wins is not to be sniffed at.

by Gary Inman

After missing last year’s Scarborough Gold Cup due to complications caused by blood poisoning, Guy Martin returned to record his eighth Gold Cup win at the road circuit in the North of England. This comes off the back of winning last month’s Ulster GP. The turn in fortune, after disappointment at the Northwest 200 and Isle of Man TT, is said to be down to new tyre compounds coming from the Tyco TAS Suzuki team’s suppliers, Pirelli.

Guy beat Isle of Man legend John McGuinness and other leading roads specialists, including TT winners, Michael Dunlop and Bruce Anstey, on his way to five wins from six starts over the two-day race meeting. Only an electrical glitch, in a Supersport race he was leading, stopped him from claiming a 100% record.

It’s been a great day and nice to get my hands back on the Gold Cup for the eighth time,” said Guy. “I enjoyed the battle with McGuinness and co. for the win, which made it that little bit more special, and to give Tyco Suzuki their first win here is mint. The boys always put in a big effort for me so they really deserve it. We almost, almost, had the clean sweep only for what I believe to be a tilt switch problem that caused the bike to cut out in the last race. She was grand when I got her back up onto the fat of the tyre, but it was too risky to take a chance with it. We’ll be happy with our lot: five wins is not to be sniffed at.

Read more