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Renzo Giust
I Dainese Me
Nico Cereghini
Italian Legendary Tour
Gary Inman
 
 
 
 
 
 

SUPERSPORT AND SUPERSTOCK RACES REPORT

05 June 2012 | News | I Dainese Me

by Phil Wain

The second race day at the Isle of Man TT Races on Monday was all about one team – Padgetts Honda. Based in Yorkshire, England the team took Bruce Anstey and John McGuinness to victory in the Supersport and Superstock races respectively, the third time in four years they’ve completed the double on Monday race day following their success in 2009 and 2010 with Ian Hutchinson.

The name of Padgetts has been synonymous with motorcycling now for over 50 years and they’ve been contesting the TT for almost as long where their tally of success mirrors that achieved at practically every other circuit across the British Isles.

The Batley-based team has long been taking riders to success, whether on the roads or on the short circuits, and the list of riders who have graced their machines continues to read like a who’s who of the sport. More recently, they’ve been associated with Anstey, McGuinness and Hutchinson on the roads and it’s clear they run a well drilled, close knit operation – and an enthusiastic one where enjoyment is the key factor.

Run by Clive Padgett, son of founder Peter Padgett, the team go racing to enjoy themselves and their success is all achieved by the lack of a big name title sponsor. As McGuinness says, “the Padgetts team aren’t just my sponsors, they’re my friends too and it’s like one big family. We all have fun and enjoy ourselves and that plays a huge part in our success.” Indeed, in the last 24 TT races, Padgetts have won 11 of them. Remarkable.

McGuinness’ 19th win was yet another start to finish victory but for Anstey it was the complete opposite as the Supersport race saw the second closest race in TT history. There was never more than a couple of seconds between the Kiwi, Cameron Donald and Gary Johnson and although the latter ran out of fuel over the final few miles, Anstey and Donald were racing right until the last moment and it was the former that prevailed by just 0.77 seconds. Race winning margins like that are rare in short circuit racing let alone after over 150 miles of racing on the most demanding course in the world!

That’s my 9th win but it’s probably the hardest one,” said Anstey. “I saw ‘P6’ on my board early on and thought ‘oh no, not again’ after my slow start on Saturday. I wasn’t going fast enough and was a bit angry with myself so got my head down and really went for it. I ran wide once, can’t remember where, but really went for it on the last lap. I was trying really hard but my board was still saying either ‘+1’ or ‘-1’ although I’d worked out it was Cameron who I must have been dicing with. I got a glimpse of him a few times so used him as a gauge and I just managed to squeeze home.

It was another frustrating day for Guy Martin with fifth place in the evening’s 4-lap Royal London 360 Superstock race his only finish of the day. Forced to make a tyre change at the solitary pitstop (when no one else did), getting onto the podium was always going to be a tall order for the Tyco Suzuki rider and although the search for a first ever TT win continues, it did go some way to making up for retirement in the earlier Supersport race where he was forced to retire with a fuel pump problem at the end of lap one.

I wasn’t quite sure what the problem was or how bad it was going to be until Cameron Donald came past me in the Supersport race and I just couldn’t hang onto him,” said MartinThe bike just wouldn’t hold the revs, but that’s the TT – the smallest of problems can cost you any chance of a podium. In the Superstock race I was in the hunt for a podium in the opening laps and had a good steady run, but we just weren’t good enough today for the win. The boys did a great pit stop for me and the new rubber helped, but it just wasn’t enough at the end. We get another go on Wednesday in the second Supersport race and then on Friday in the Senior so I’m still hopeful of nailing that first win.

Conor Cummins again had to watch from the sidelines and, if he’s to race at TT2012, it’s likely it will just be in Friday’s Senior race. The Manxman continues to put a brave face on his dilemma but it’s no doubt the pain he’s feeling from not racing is a lot greater than the pain in his injured right hand.

by Phil Wain

The second race day at the Isle of Man TT Races on Monday was all about one team – Padgetts Honda. Based in Yorkshire, England the team took Bruce Anstey and John McGuinness to victory in the Supersport and Superstock races respectively, the third time in four years they’ve completed the double on Monday race day following their success in 2009 and 2010 with Ian Hutchinson.

The name of Padgetts has been synonymous with motorcycling now for over 50 years and they’ve been contesting the TT for almost as long where their tally of success mirrors that achieved at practically every other circuit across the British Isles.

The Batley-based team has long been taking riders to success, whether on the roads or on the short circuits, and the list of riders who have graced their machines continues to read like a who’s who of the sport. More recently, they’ve been associated with Anstey, McGuinness and Hutchinson on the roads and it’s clear they run a well drilled, close knit operation – and an enthusiastic one where enjoyment is the key factor.

Run by Clive Padgett, son of founder Peter Padgett, the team go racing to enjoy themselves and their success is all achieved by the lack of a big name title sponsor. As McGuinness says, “the Padgetts team aren’t just my sponsors, they’re my friends too and it’s like one big family. We all have fun and enjoy ourselves and that plays a huge part in our success.” Indeed, in the last 24 TT races, Padgetts have won 11 of them. Remarkable.

McGuinness’ 19th win was yet another start to finish victory but for Anstey it was the complete opposite as the Supersport race saw the second closest race in TT history. There was never more than a couple of seconds between the Kiwi, Cameron Donald and Gary Johnson and although the latter ran out of fuel over the final few miles, Anstey and Donald were racing right until the last moment and it was the former that prevailed by just 0.77 seconds. Race winning margins like that are rare in short circuit racing let alone after over 150 miles of racing on the most demanding course in the world!

That’s my 9th win but it’s probably the hardest one,” said Anstey. “I saw ‘P6’ on my board early on and thought ‘oh no, not again’ after my slow start on Saturday. I wasn’t going fast enough and was a bit angry with myself so got my head down and really went for it. I ran wide once, can’t remember where, but really went for it on the last lap. I was trying really hard but my board was still saying either ‘+1’ or ‘-1’ although I’d worked out it was Cameron who I must have been dicing with. I got a glimpse of him a few times so used him as a gauge and I just managed to squeeze home.

It was another frustrating day for Guy Martin with fifth place in the evening’s 4-lap Royal London 360 Superstock race his only finish of the day. Forced to make a tyre change at the solitary pitstop (when no one else did), getting onto the podium was always going to be a tall order for the Tyco Suzuki rider and although the search for a first ever TT win continues, it did go some way to making up for retirement in the earlier Supersport race where he was forced to retire with a fuel pump problem at the end of lap one.

I wasn’t quite sure what the problem was or how bad it was going to be until Cameron Donald came past me in the Supersport race and I just couldn’t hang onto him,” said MartinThe bike just wouldn’t hold the revs, but that’s the TT – the smallest of problems can cost you any chance of a podium. In the Superstock race I was in the hunt for a podium in the opening laps and had a good steady run, but we just weren’t good enough today for the win. The boys did a great pit stop for me and the new rubber helped, but it just wasn’t enough at the end. We get another go on Wednesday in the second Supersport race and then on Friday in the Senior so I’m still hopeful of nailing that first win.

Conor Cummins again had to watch from the sidelines and, if he’s to race at TT2012, it’s likely it will just be in Friday’s Senior race. The Manxman continues to put a brave face on his dilemma but it’s no doubt the pain he’s feeling from not racing is a lot greater than the pain in his injured right hand.

Tags: TT, Guy Martin, Conor Cummins, Isle of Man

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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