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Renzo Giust
I Dainese Me
Nico Cereghini
Italian Legendary Tour
Gary Inman
 
 
 
 
 
 

USA ROAD TRIP, DAY 18

06 November 2012 | News

by Gary Inman

Day 18: Jackson, TN to Cruso, NC

While this trip has been, and continues to be, an incredible experience it’s now the longest I’ve been away from my wife and kids and it feels like the best roads and sites are behind us. Packing the bike up at 6.15am knowing there’s a day of rain ahead is not much fun. Today I leave ahead of everyone else, because I’m making another detour, this time to visit a record shop in Nashville.

It’s more Interstate and the spray coming off lorries is blinding. By the time I reach Nashville, at 10am, I’ve already seen the aftermath of three bad accidents: a car on its roof, another smashed into the central reservation.

The shop I want to visit isn’t any old record shop, it’s Third Man Records and belongs to Jack White, formerly of The White Stripes, The Raconteurs, The Dead Weather, and now performing solo. It’s a tiny store, that only sells his record label’s own records, but it’s still a special place and well worth the detour. I leve with four 7-inch singles.

I rejoin the Interstate and not long after Keith, an Englishman policeman who is on the trip, appears next to me on his huge BMW Adventure. For a policeman he rides like a lunatic. I tuck in behind him as we hurl along the highway. We’re overtaking everything, abusing the speed limit, taking risks. We’re doing it for two reasons. Being the quickest thing on the road puts you in charge. Dawdle along and the articulated trucks, that do 80mph and don’t slow down for anything, are overtaking you, obscuring you in a cloud of soaking spray and pulling in when they want. We want to be in charge.

The other reason we’re riding this fast is to get this hellish day over as soon as possible.

The rain stops for the last 50 miles of the day. We arrive at the Blue Ridge Motorcycle Campground, North Carolina. We were supposed to be camping, but the organisers of the trip cancelled it and booked the cabins for us to stay in instead. After a hot shower, the rain catches up and is so heavy it floods the campsite. I could kiss my Dainese boots (ST Tour Torq Goretex). They’re the only pair of boots, out of the 14 pairs that braved the weather today, that didn’t leak.

At 7pm, the onsite canteen cooks up freshly caught trout and homemade apple pie. It’s an incredible meal in a great setting. Just when I thought the trip was on a downer, I’m back on a high. I run back to the cabin, crawl into bed and fall asleep listening to the rain hammer on the roof of the cabin. I can’t even imagine being in a tent tonight.

Gary is riding from New York to California and back to New York with www.nicksanders.com

by Gary Inman

Day 18: Jackson, TN to Cruso, NC

While this trip has been, and continues to be, an incredible experience it’s now the longest I’ve been away from my wife and kids and it feels like the best roads and sites are behind us. Packing the bike up at 6.15am knowing there’s a day of rain ahead is not much fun. Today I leave ahead of everyone else, because I’m making another detour, this time to visit a record shop in Nashville.

It’s more Interstate and the spray coming off lorries is blinding. By the time I reach Nashville, at 10am, I’ve already seen the aftermath of three bad accidents: a car on its roof, another smashed into the central reservation.

The shop I want to visit isn’t any old record shop, it’s Third Man Records and belongs to Jack White, formerly of The White Stripes, The Raconteurs, The Dead Weather, and now performing solo. It’s a tiny store, that only sells his record label’s own records, but it’s still a special place and well worth the detour. I leve with four 7-inch singles.

I rejoin the Interstate and not long after Keith, an Englishman policeman who is on the trip, appears next to me on his huge BMW Adventure. For a policeman he rides like a lunatic. I tuck in behind him as we hurl along the highway. We’re overtaking everything, abusing the speed limit, taking risks. We’re doing it for two reasons. Being the quickest thing on the road puts you in charge. Dawdle along and the articulated trucks, that do 80mph and don’t slow down for anything, are overtaking you, obscuring you in a cloud of soaking spray and pulling in when they want. We want to be in charge.

The other reason we’re riding this fast is to get this hellish day over as soon as possible.

The rain stops for the last 50 miles of the day. We arrive at the Blue Ridge Motorcycle Campground, North Carolina. We were supposed to be camping, but the organisers of the trip cancelled it and booked the cabins for us to stay in instead. After a hot shower, the rain catches up and is so heavy it floods the campsite. I could kiss my Dainese boots (ST Tour Torq Goretex). They’re the only pair of boots, out of the 14 pairs that braved the weather today, that didn’t leak.

At 7pm, the onsite canteen cooks up freshly caught trout and homemade apple pie. It’s an incredible meal in a great setting. Just when I thought the trip was on a downer, I’m back on a high. I run back to the cabin, crawl into bed and fall asleep listening to the rain hammer on the roof of the cabin. I can’t even imagine being in a tent tonight.

Gary is riding from New York to California and back to New York with www.nicksanders.com

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USA ROAD TRIP, DAY 16 AND 17

31 October 2012 | News

by Gary Inman

Day 16: Amarillo, TX to Fort Smith, AR

Stewart’s Triumph Tiger Explorer signals to pull off the highway. It’s started to rain and Stewart left our Texas hotel in just his jeans and jacket. Now he’s on the hard shoulder of the off-ramp, doing the one-legged tango trying to get his waterproof trousers on without taking his boots off. It takes him five minutes to change and find his waterproof gloves. Rain is spotting my visor and the sky is full of bruised clouds. Just then a Harley riders passes in front of us and waves. He’s wearing a leather waistcoat, open, and a pair of jeans, no helmet. He does have the blubber of a walrus, but nonetheless we all suddenly feel over-dressed and a little bit wimpy.

Today’s ride takes us along the top of Texas, right through Oklahoma and into Arkansas.

There are few distractions to glimpse at the side of the road. The most memorable is Yukon, a town shouting , loudly, about being the birthplace of country star, Garth Brooks. That was a highlight. It is that kind of day.

Other than that the day is one of those where we just have to cover miles on boring roads. It’s impossible to cross a continent twice in three weeks and not have a few days like this.

Our mood lifts when we ride through the town of Fort Smith, Arkansas, our overnight stop. It’s Saturday night and the main street has a couple of good-looking bars. I keep following the Garmin to the hotel and end up at a dump on the wrong side of the tracks. After 700km of boring interstate this hotel, we’re now 13km from the town centre. We book a cab (there’s one company in the whole town, with four or five cars. Our taxi is so filthy Stewart is trying to levitate in the back. The driver’s baseball cap needs an oil change), and head straight back to the town. It turns out to be one the best nights of the trip – hot Cajun food, too many beers, live band, weird locals – great ingredients for a long day’s road tripping.

*******

Day 17: Fort Smith, AR to Jackson, TN

I roll out of bed at 6.15, pull on my trousers, stuff everything back into my bags and start carrying them out to the bike. It’s still dark but, as usual, there are already a bunch of riders all kitted up and ready to leave. Today, there more than usual because the route takes us right past Memphis and most riders want to make a pilgrimage to Gracelands.

I’ve visited Elvis’s mansion in the past, so I head for another Memphis rock and roll landmark I prefer, Sun Studio.

Sun Studios is the birthplace of rock and roll. It’s the place where the song most people agree is the first rock and roll tune – Rocket 88 by Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats - was recorded. And, though it is a museum and gift shop, Sun is a still a working studio where bands, including U2, have recorded.

What makes Sun so brilliant is the enthusiasm of the tour guides. They give their spiel five or six times a day, but still summon up the love and enthusiasm for the place, the people who recorded here and the music they made. When you read the list of greats who were given a break by Sun Studios boss, Sam Perkins, it’s easy to understand why the tour guides love it here: Howlin’ Wol, BB King, Rufus Thomas, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins and, of course, Elvis Presley.

When we climb back on the bikes, the heat and humidity of Memphis engulfs us. It’s not helped by one of the riders with us losing his key and spending over an hour searching for it including all over the studio (he’d put it in his girlfriend’s pocket – that a good reason not to wear matching jackets).

We eventually cross another state line into Tennessee. And with it, the finish line comes ever closer.

Gary is riding from New York to California and back to New York with www.nicksanders.com

by Gary Inman

Day 16: Amarillo, TX to Fort Smith, AR

Stewart’s Triumph Tiger Explorer signals to pull off the highway. It’s started to rain and Stewart left our Texas hotel in just his jeans and jacket. Now he’s on the hard shoulder of the off-ramp, doing the one-legged tango trying to get his waterproof trousers on without taking his boots off. It takes him five minutes to change and find his waterproof gloves. Rain is spotting my visor and the sky is full of bruised clouds. Just then a Harley riders passes in front of us and waves. He’s wearing a leather waistcoat, open, and a pair of jeans, no helmet. He does have the blubber of a walrus, but nonetheless we all suddenly feel over-dressed and a little bit wimpy.

Today’s ride takes us along the top of Texas, right through Oklahoma and into Arkansas.

There are few distractions to glimpse at the side of the road. The most memorable is Yukon, a town shouting , loudly, about being the birthplace of country star, Garth Brooks. That was a highlight. It is that kind of day.

Other than that the day is one of those where we just have to cover miles on boring roads. It’s impossible to cross a continent twice in three weeks and not have a few days like this.

Our mood lifts when we ride through the town of Fort Smith, Arkansas, our overnight stop. It’s Saturday night and the main street has a couple of good-looking bars. I keep following the Garmin to the hotel and end up at a dump on the wrong side of the tracks. After 700km of boring interstate this hotel, we’re now 13km from the town centre. We book a cab (there’s one company in the whole town, with four or five cars. Our taxi is so filthy Stewart is trying to levitate in the back. The driver’s baseball cap needs an oil change), and head straight back to the town. It turns out to be one the best nights of the trip – hot Cajun food, too many beers, live band, weird locals – great ingredients for a long day’s road tripping.

*******

Day 17: Fort Smith, AR to Jackson, TN

I roll out of bed at 6.15, pull on my trousers, stuff everything back into my bags and start carrying them out to the bike. It’s still dark but, as usual, there are already a bunch of riders all kitted up and ready to leave. Today, there more than usual because the route takes us right past Memphis and most riders want to make a pilgrimage to Gracelands.

I’ve visited Elvis’s mansion in the past, so I head for another Memphis rock and roll landmark I prefer, Sun Studio.

Sun Studios is the birthplace of rock and roll. It’s the place where the song most people agree is the first rock and roll tune – Rocket 88 by Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats - was recorded. And, though it is a museum and gift shop, Sun is a still a working studio where bands, including U2, have recorded.

What makes Sun so brilliant is the enthusiasm of the tour guides. They give their spiel five or six times a day, but still summon up the love and enthusiasm for the place, the people who recorded here and the music they made. When you read the list of greats who were given a break by Sun Studios boss, Sam Perkins, it’s easy to understand why the tour guides love it here: Howlin’ Wol, BB King, Rufus Thomas, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins and, of course, Elvis Presley.

When we climb back on the bikes, the heat and humidity of Memphis engulfs us. It’s not helped by one of the riders with us losing his key and spending over an hour searching for it including all over the studio (he’d put it in his girlfriend’s pocket – that a good reason not to wear matching jackets).

We eventually cross another state line into Tennessee. And with it, the finish line comes ever closer.

Gary is riding from New York to California and back to New York with www.nicksanders.com

Read more

 
 
 
 
 
 

AFTER AUSTRALIA

30 October 2012 | Events

by Nico Cereghini

Come da copione, Casey Stoner ha stravinto per la sesta volta consecutiva la corsa di casa: a Phillip Island nessuno può battere il pilota che - roba da non credere - domani attaccherà il casco al chiodo. E Jorge Lorenzo, da domenica, è campione del mondo per la quarta volta: la seconda in MotoGP, con la Yamaha, e Ramon Forcada a dirigere la squadra al novanta per cento italiana. Dani Pedrosa, che generosamente ha attaccato fin dal via, invece è caduto al secondo giro perché stava percorrendo una traiettoria di trenta centimetri esterna a quella ideale.

Titolo assolutamente meritato, quello di Jorge. Lo spagnolo è stato velocissimo e intelligente. Come già accadde nel 2010 il successo verrà archiviato insieme alle considerazioni che il miglior rivale, allora Valentino e in questo caso Stoner, sia stato eliminato da un incidente per un numero importante di gare; ma il maiorchino ha dato tutto, e nella seconda metà della stagione, cresciuta tanto la Honda, era anche in una condizione di inferiorità tecnica. In Australia, come altrove, non ha nemmeno potuto combattere, viaggiando tutto solo 10 secondi dietro alla Honda di Stoner e nettamente davanti a Crutchlow. Più indietro bella lotta per il quarto posto, con Dovizioso capace di dominare l’ultimo giro su Bautista e Bradl. Poi le Ducati: Rossi, Hayden e Abraham, a precedere la migliore delle CRT cioè quella di Aleix Espargaro.

L’altro titolo mondiale assegnato a Phillip Island, quello della Moto2, ha premiato Marc Marquez che questa volta non ha ingaggiato duelli con Pol Espargaro. Che ha vinto in solitudine guidando alla Stoner. Il neo campione ha subìto a lungo Redding e poi anche il rientro di West, ma nell’ultima curva, deciso a salire almeno sul podio, ha fatto uno dei suoi miracoli e ha preceduto almeno Redding. Marc sarà un pilota tosto anche in MotoGP fin dalla prossima stagione. Bella gara di Corsi, settimo, mentre è uscito per rottura del motore Andrea Iannone quando mirava al podio.

Infine, peccato che la Moto3 abbia registrato un avvio convulso con quattro partenti “anticipati” tra i quali due attesi protagonisti come Folger e Salom. Il successo del neo campione Sandro Cortese è stato più che autorevole. Secondo Oliveira davanti a Sissis che a sua volta ha vinto una bella volata su Rins, Kent e i nostri Fenati e Tonucci in sesta e settima posizione. Niccolò Antonelli, purtroppo caduto nelle prove e rimasto per qualche istante privo di sensi, non ha preso la partenza ma sarà certamente in pista per la chiusura di Valencia.

by Nico Cereghini

As if it were preordained, Casey Stoner walked away with his sixth consecutive win home race. No one can beat him at Phillip Island so it's hard to believe but tomorrow he hangs up his helmet Since Sunday Jorge Lorenzo is World Champion for the fourth time. This is his second in MotoGP with Yamaha and with Ramon Forcada who has been managing the 90% Italian team. Dani Pedrosa bravely fought right from the start but fell on the second lap after running about 30 centimetres wide of the ideal line.

Jorge thoroughly deserved the title. The Spaniard rode with great speed and intelligence. As happened in 2010, his success will be measured against his closest rival, Valentino at that time and Stoner this time, two riders who missed a relatively high number of races due to injury. Jorge however always gave his all and from mid-season the Honda performed better so he found himself less technically competitive. In Australia, like elsewhere, Jorge couldn't even fight and stayed 10 seconds behind Stoner's Honda and well ahead of Crutchlow. Further back there was a great scrap for fourth place with Dovizioso managing to hold off Bautista and Bradl over the last lap. Then came the Ducatis - Rossi, Hayden and Abraham ahead of the best of the CRTs ridden by Aleix Espargaro.

The other World Championship title settled at Phillip Island was in the Moto2 class in which Marc Marquez this time was not battling with Pol Espargaro. Espargaro won with a solitary Stoner style ride. The new Champion was behind Redding and West for a long time but Marquez got a strong drive out of the final corner in a bid for the podium and squeezed past Redding. Marc will be no less capable in MotoGP right from the start of next season. Corsi rode well and finished seventh but Andrea Iannone was unfortunate to suffer mechanical problems when he had been hoping for a podium finish.

What a shame that the Moto3 race was marred by jump starts that saw riders like Folger and Salom given ride-through penalties. The new Champion, Sandro Cortese rode with great authority. Second across the line was Oliveira ahead of Sissis who won a fantastic finish with Rins, Kent and Fenati and Tonucci who came home in sixth and seventh places. Niccolò Antonelli unfortunately fell in practice and after losing consciousness for a few seconds did not take part in the race. He will however definitely be there for the last event of the season in Valencia.

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