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Renzo Giust
I Dainese Me
Nico Cereghini
Italian Legendary Tour
Gary Inman
 
 
 
 
 
 

LEON HASLAM’S PLAYLIST

29 Juni 2012 | News

The songs that get him revving

You’re So Vain by Carly Simon, is a real cool song. I laugh at the words. I’m into meaningful songs, rather just headbanging music. That’s why I listen to some country stuff likeThe Devil Went Down to Georgia by Charlie Daniels.
I do like some heavier tunes like Paradise City by Guns n Roses, though. When you race at the Suzuka 8hr endurance race in Japan, they ask you to choose a piece of music to play over the loudspeakers while you do your Superpole lap.
I chose The Pretender by The Foo Fighters. Rocketman by Elton John, reminds me of my dad, who was given the name The Rocket when he raced. Leon scrolls through his iPod. Someone Like You by Adele, I think is a really cool tune.
And Caravan of Love by the Po’ Boys, that was [ex-World Superbike racer] Jamie Whitham’s band.
They played at my wedding.

You’re So Vain
The Devil went down to Georgia
Paradise City
The Pretender
 
Someone like you
Caravan of love

The songs that get him revving

You’re So Vain by Carly Simon, is a real cool song. I laugh at the words. I’m into meaningful songs, rather just headbanging music. That’s why I listen to some country stuff likeThe Devil Went Down to Georgia by Charlie Daniels.
I do like some heavier tunes like Paradise City by Guns n Roses, though. When you race at the Suzuka 8hr endurance race in Japan, they ask you to choose a piece of music to play over the loudspeakers while you do your Superpole lap.
I chose The Pretender by The Foo Fighters. Rocketman by Elton John, reminds me of my dad, who was given the name The Rocket when he raced. Leon scrolls through his iPod. Someone Like You by Adele, I think is a really cool tune.
And Caravan of Love by the Po’ Boys, that was [ex-World Superbike racer] Jamie Whitham’s band.
They played at my wedding.

You’re So Vain
The Devil went down to Georgia
Paradise City
The Pretender
 
Someone like you
Caravan of love
Read more

 
 
 
 
 
 

A CHAT WITH LEON HASLAM

15 Mai 2012 | News

DAINESE: felicità e frustrazione: 2 sentimenti opposti hanno caratterizzato il tuo weekend a Donington. Cosa ci puoi raccontare a riguardo?
LEON HASLAM: Sono molto amareggiato, potevamo avere due primi posti e invece non ne abbiamo avuto neanche uno a causa di errori fatti da altri.

DAINESE: A parte la conclusione di Gara2, Donington ha confermato che la BMW è cresciuta molto. Ora lo scenario del campionato può cambiare...
LEON HASLAM: Sono felice per questi miglioramenti, questa stagione però abbiamo perso più di 50 punti a causa delle cadute ma siamo a soli 40 punti dalla vetta della classifica.

DAINESE: Hai uno speciale rapporto con il DS Giacomo Guidotti fin da quando correvi in Suzuki. Quanto va attribuito a Giacomo questo grande risultato?
LEON HASLAM: Il mio rapporto con Giacomo è fantastico e lui rappresenta la maggior ragione per tutti i miglioramenti che abbiamo ottenuto finora. Anche gli altri 2 miei meccanici che mi hanno raggiunto dalla Suzuki, Stefano e Bruno, hanno rappresentato un importante fattore quest'anno.

DAINESE: Cosa ti aspetti dalla prossima gara negli Stati Uniti al circuito di Miller?
LEON HASLAM: Miller è stato la nostra peggior gara lo scorso anno quindi non vedo l'ora di vedere come la nostra moto si comporterà questa stagione, spero di essere davanti ancora

DAINESE: Quanto importante è avere la tua famiglia vicino durante le gare?
LEON HASLAM: Avere la mia famiglia con me è molto importante, mi aiuta a concentrarmi su quello che devo fare...

DAINESE: happiness and frustration: two different feelings have characterized your weekend at Donington. what can you say about it?
LEON HASLAM: I am very disappointed we could have had 2,1st places and we didn't get one due to other peoples mistake.

DAINESE: apart of dramatic end of race 2, Donington has proved that BMW has grown a lot. Now the championship scenario can change....
LEON HASLAM: I'm happy with the progress this season we have lost more than 50 points due to crashes and we are only 40 points from the lead..

DAINESE: you have a special relationship with your crew chief Giacomo Guidotti since the period in Suzuki. How much Giacomo is involved in this great result?
LEON HASLAM: my relationship with Giacomo is fantastic and is the main reason for all the positive changes we have made also my other 2 mechanics that have joined me from suzuki Stefano and Bruno have been a big factor this season.

DAINESE: what do you expect for the next race in Us at Miller?
LEON HASLAM: Miller was our worst Race last year so I am looking forward to seeing what our bike will be like this season I hope to challenge again at the front.

DAINESE: how important is having your family next to you during the races?
LEON HASLAM: to have my family with me is very important have the best people around me which helps me alot to concentrate on what I need to do...

Read more

 
 
 
 
 
 

INTERVIEW: LEON HASLAM

19 April 2012 | News

by Gary Inman

Leon Haslam

The British-born World Superbike star, and son of GP racer Ron, has grown up on the world’s race paddocks. We caught up with Leon to fire a few questions at him.

LEON HASLAM

Date of Birth
31 May 1983

Team
BMW Motorrad Motorsport SBK

Married
Yes, to Oli, since December 2010.

Children
Yes, one daughter, Ava May, born the 12th, December, 2011.

 

If you weren’t racing, what would you be doing?
I couldn’t imagine not racing, or being in some competitive sport. I travelled the world with my dad since I was six weeks old, and racing paddocks is all I’ve know, so I’d be involved in some way or other, definitely involved in something competitive.

What’s your favourite corner?
Probably turn three at Phillip Island, the fast downhill left before Honda. You just click fifth gear as you’re tipping in, you’re sideways, hitting big bumps, then you’re getting on the gas really, really hard. You’re completely sideways, then you’ve got to get it all stopped for a first gear hairpin. It’s such a high-speed, ballsy corner.

What’s the best thing about being a professional racer?
Not many people get to do what they truly love for a living, and racing for me is everything, it’s my life. If I couldn’t be a racer I don’t know what my purpose on Earth would be. I feel very lucky that I get to do what I love to do: race motorbikes in different places around the world.

The worst?
The lows are the injuries. The lows can sometimes take the fun out of racing. There are tragedies, like what happened to Simoncelli, but these things happen in lots of areas of life. The point of racing is that it’s fun, so that’s what you’ve got to concentrate on. What you’ve got to do is learn from the lows and progress.

Finish this sentence: Winning is…
Everything.

Pain is…
Weakness leaving the body.

If you could race in any era, when would it be?
I grew up in the Freddie Spencer and Wayne Gardner era. I also saw the Schwantz side of things and I was good mates with Alex Barros when he was team-mates with my dad, and you know, all that era was nice, because everyone got on, and went playing football together after the racing was over. They flew model helicopters together and all that sort of thing. It was less corporate and a more chilled way to go racing. That’s the way I live my life. The era of Fogarty, Slight and Corser and all their battles in World Superbike was a really good era, too.

If you could have any superpower, what would it be?
At the moment, the power to heal. I’ve bashed myself up these last few weeks. Injuries can get you down. You train all winter and you pick up a little injury early in the year and it knocks you back a bit.

Do you have a motto you live your life by?
The motto would be ‘Enjoy it’. That’s sometimes hard in racing, but a happy rider is a fast rider. Having the right people around me is key to trying to stay happy.

Finally, what’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given?
My dad made me realise I wanted to be a racer. He made me realise I wanted racing more than life. That was the best advice, because it doesn’t matter how hard things are getting I know I’m doing what I love the most. So, I suppose, the advice was ‘analyse yourself’, discover what’s important to you.

Leon is arguably the most experienced British rider still racing at the highest level. He has competed in 125, 250 and 500cc GPs, plus British Superbike and World Superbike. In 2001, he was the youngest ever rider to compete in 500cc Grands Prix.
The son of GP star Ron Haslam, Leon was always destined to be a racer and cut his teeth racing Piaggio automatics before progressing through the ranks. He has raced Honda, Suzuki and Ducati in the World Superbike championship and is team-mates with Marco Melandri in the official BMW Motorrad squad for 2012. He also works as a riding tutor at his parents’ race school in the UK.

http://www.leonhaslam.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/realleonhaslam
http://www.worldsbk.com
http://www.haslamraceschool.com/

by Gary Inman

Leon Haslam

The British-born World Superbike star, and son of GP racer Ron, has grown up on the world’s race paddocks. We caught up with Leon to fire a few questions at him.

LEON HASLAM

Date of Birth
31 May 1983

Team
BMW Motorrad Motorsport SBK

Married
Yes, to Oli, since December 2010.

Children
Yes, one daughter, Ava May, born the 12th, December, 2011.

 

If you weren’t racing, what would you be doing?
I couldn’t imagine not racing, or being in some competitive sport. I travelled the world with my dad since I was six weeks old, and racing paddocks is all I’ve know, so I’d be involved in some way or other, definitely involved in something competitive.

What’s your favourite corner?
Probably turn three at Phillip Island, the fast downhill left before Honda. You just click fifth gear as you’re tipping in, you’re sideways, hitting big bumps, then you’re getting on the gas really, really hard. You’re completely sideways, then you’ve got to get it all stopped for a first gear hairpin. It’s such a high-speed, ballsy corner.

What’s the best thing about being a professional racer?
Not many people get to do what they truly love for a living, and racing for me is everything, it’s my life. If I couldn’t be a racer I don’t know what my purpose on Earth would be. I feel very lucky that I get to do what I love to do: race motorbikes in different places around the world.

The worst?
The lows are the injuries. The lows can sometimes take the fun out of racing. There are tragedies, like what happened to Simoncelli, but these things happen in lots of areas of life. The point of racing is that it’s fun, so that’s what you’ve got to concentrate on. What you’ve got to do is learn from the lows and progress.

Finish this sentence: Winning is…
Everything.

Pain is…
Weakness leaving the body.

If you could race in any era, when would it be?
I grew up in the Freddie Spencer and Wayne Gardner era. I also saw the Schwantz side of things and I was good mates with Alex Barros when he was team-mates with my dad, and you know, all that era was nice, because everyone got on, and went playing football together after the racing was over. They flew model helicopters together and all that sort of thing. It was less corporate and a more chilled way to go racing. That’s the way I live my life. The era of Fogarty, Slight and Corser and all their battles in World Superbike was a really good era, too.

If you could have any superpower, what would it be?
At the moment, the power to heal. I’ve bashed myself up these last few weeks. Injuries can get you down. You train all winter and you pick up a little injury early in the year and it knocks you back a bit.

Do you have a motto you live your life by?
The motto would be ‘Enjoy it’. That’s sometimes hard in racing, but a happy rider is a fast rider. Having the right people around me is key to trying to stay happy.

Finally, what’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given?
My dad made me realise I wanted to be a racer. He made me realise I wanted racing more than life. That was the best advice, because it doesn’t matter how hard things are getting I know I’m doing what I love the most. So, I suppose, the advice was ‘analyse yourself’, discover what’s important to you.

Leon is arguably the most experienced British rider still racing at the highest level. He has competed in 125, 250 and 500cc GPs, plus British Superbike and World Superbike. In 2001, he was the youngest ever rider to compete in 500cc Grands Prix.
The son of GP star Ron Haslam, Leon was always destined to be a racer and cut his teeth racing Piaggio automatics before progressing through the ranks. He has raced Honda, Suzuki and Ducati in the World Superbike championship and is team-mates with Marco Melandri in the official BMW Motorrad squad for 2012. He also works as a riding tutor at his parents’ race school in the UK.

http://www.leonhaslam.com/
http://twitter.com/#!/realleonhaslam
http://www.worldsbk.com
http://www.haslamraceschool.com/

Read more