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Renzo Giust
I Dainese Me
Nico Cereghini
Italian Legendary Tour
Gary Inman
 
 
 
 
 
 

THE DEMONS OF DUNDROD

08 August 2012 | News

by Gary Inman

The Ulster GP, the last of the important ‘international’ real road race of the season, takes place in Northern Ireland this week.

One of the most historic races in the world, this year it celebrates its 90th anniversary, having first been run in 1922. It has always been held on closed roads (like the Isle of Man TT), and the original layout was the 20.5 mile (32.99km) Clady Circuit, used up until 1939. The Clady was reduced to 16.5 miles (26.55km) when competition resumed, after World War II, in 1947.

In 1953 the race began to use the Dundrod circuit, very similar to the 7.4-mile (11.91km) layout it uses to this day.

The most notable thing about the Ulster GP is that it has the quickest average lap speed of any motorcycle track in the world. The current outright lap record record is held by Dainese rider Conor Cummins – an astonishing average lap speed of 133.284mph (214.5kph). That’s the average speed!

The circuit has some real man’s corners,’ is how Guy Martin describes it. Flat out in sixth gear, leant hard over, between the hedges. And he’s had his fair share of wins here.

Both Conor and Guy will be in action, racing in Supersport, Superstock ad Superbike classes on their TYCO by TAS Racing Suzukis.

by Gary Inman

The Ulster GP, the last of the important ‘international’ real road race of the season, takes place in Northern Ireland this week.

One of the most historic races in the world, this year it celebrates its 90th anniversary, having first been run in 1922. It has always been held on closed roads (like the Isle of Man TT), and the original layout was the 20.5 mile (32.99km) Clady Circuit, used up until 1939. The Clady was reduced to 16.5 miles (26.55km) when competition resumed, after World War II, in 1947.

In 1953 the race began to use the Dundrod circuit, very similar to the 7.4-mile (11.91km) layout it uses to this day.

The most notable thing about the Ulster GP is that it has the quickest average lap speed of any motorcycle track in the world. The current outright lap record record is held by Dainese rider Conor Cummins – an astonishing average lap speed of 133.284mph (214.5kph). That’s the average speed!

The circuit has some real man’s corners,’ is how Guy Martin describes it. Flat out in sixth gear, leant hard over, between the hedges. And he’s had his fair share of wins here.

Both Conor and Guy will be in action, racing in Supersport, Superstock ad Superbike classes on their TYCO by TAS Racing Suzukis.

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by Phil Wain

The second race day at the Isle of Man TT Races on Monday was all about one team – Padgetts Honda. Based in Yorkshire, England the team took Bruce Anstey and John McGuinness to victory in the Supersport and Superstock races respectively, the third time in four years they’ve completed the double on Monday race day following their success in 2009 and 2010 with Ian Hutchinson.

The name of Padgetts has been synonymous with motorcycling now for over 50 years and they’ve been contesting the TT for almost as long where their tally of success mirrors that achieved at practically every other circuit across the British Isles.

The Batley-based team has long been taking riders to success, whether on the roads or on the short circuits, and the list of riders who have graced their machines continues to read like a who’s who of the sport. More recently, they’ve been associated with Anstey, McGuinness and Hutchinson on the roads and it’s clear they run a well drilled, close knit operation – and an enthusiastic one where enjoyment is the key factor.

Run by Clive Padgett, son of founder Peter Padgett, the team go racing to enjoy themselves and their success is all achieved by the lack of a big name title sponsor. As McGuinness says, “the Padgetts team aren’t just my sponsors, they’re my friends too and it’s like one big family. We all have fun and enjoy ourselves and that plays a huge part in our success.” Indeed, in the last 24 TT races, Padgetts have won 11 of them. Remarkable.

McGuinness’ 19th win was yet another start to finish victory but for Anstey it was the complete opposite as the Supersport race saw the second closest race in TT history. There was never more than a couple of seconds between the Kiwi, Cameron Donald and Gary Johnson and although the latter ran out of fuel over the final few miles, Anstey and Donald were racing right until the last moment and it was the former that prevailed by just 0.77 seconds. Race winning margins like that are rare in short circuit racing let alone after over 150 miles of racing on the most demanding course in the world!

That’s my 9th win but it’s probably the hardest one,” said Anstey. “I saw ‘P6’ on my board early on and thought ‘oh no, not again’ after my slow start on Saturday. I wasn’t going fast enough and was a bit angry with myself so got my head down and really went for it. I ran wide once, can’t remember where, but really went for it on the last lap. I was trying really hard but my board was still saying either ‘+1’ or ‘-1’ although I’d worked out it was Cameron who I must have been dicing with. I got a glimpse of him a few times so used him as a gauge and I just managed to squeeze home.

It was another frustrating day for Guy Martin with fifth place in the evening’s 4-lap Royal London 360 Superstock race his only finish of the day. Forced to make a tyre change at the solitary pitstop (when no one else did), getting onto the podium was always going to be a tall order for the Tyco Suzuki rider and although the search for a first ever TT win continues, it did go some way to making up for retirement in the earlier Supersport race where he was forced to retire with a fuel pump problem at the end of lap one.

I wasn’t quite sure what the problem was or how bad it was going to be until Cameron Donald came past me in the Supersport race and I just couldn’t hang onto him,” said MartinThe bike just wouldn’t hold the revs, but that’s the TT – the smallest of problems can cost you any chance of a podium. In the Superstock race I was in the hunt for a podium in the opening laps and had a good steady run, but we just weren’t good enough today for the win. The boys did a great pit stop for me and the new rubber helped, but it just wasn’t enough at the end. We get another go on Wednesday in the second Supersport race and then on Friday in the Senior so I’m still hopeful of nailing that first win.

Conor Cummins again had to watch from the sidelines and, if he’s to race at TT2012, it’s likely it will just be in Friday’s Senior race. The Manxman continues to put a brave face on his dilemma but it’s no doubt the pain he’s feeling from not racing is a lot greater than the pain in his injured right hand.

by Phil Wain

The second race day at the Isle of Man TT Races on Monday was all about one team – Padgetts Honda. Based in Yorkshire, England the team took Bruce Anstey and John McGuinness to victory in the Supersport and Superstock races respectively, the third time in four years they’ve completed the double on Monday race day following their success in 2009 and 2010 with Ian Hutchinson.

The name of Padgetts has been synonymous with motorcycling now for over 50 years and they’ve been contesting the TT for almost as long where their tally of success mirrors that achieved at practically every other circuit across the British Isles.

The Batley-based team has long been taking riders to success, whether on the roads or on the short circuits, and the list of riders who have graced their machines continues to read like a who’s who of the sport. More recently, they’ve been associated with Anstey, McGuinness and Hutchinson on the roads and it’s clear they run a well drilled, close knit operation – and an enthusiastic one where enjoyment is the key factor.

Run by Clive Padgett, son of founder Peter Padgett, the team go racing to enjoy themselves and their success is all achieved by the lack of a big name title sponsor. As McGuinness says, “the Padgetts team aren’t just my sponsors, they’re my friends too and it’s like one big family. We all have fun and enjoy ourselves and that plays a huge part in our success.” Indeed, in the last 24 TT races, Padgetts have won 11 of them. Remarkable.

McGuinness’ 19th win was yet another start to finish victory but for Anstey it was the complete opposite as the Supersport race saw the second closest race in TT history. There was never more than a couple of seconds between the Kiwi, Cameron Donald and Gary Johnson and although the latter ran out of fuel over the final few miles, Anstey and Donald were racing right until the last moment and it was the former that prevailed by just 0.77 seconds. Race winning margins like that are rare in short circuit racing let alone after over 150 miles of racing on the most demanding course in the world!

That’s my 9th win but it’s probably the hardest one,” said Anstey. “I saw ‘P6’ on my board early on and thought ‘oh no, not again’ after my slow start on Saturday. I wasn’t going fast enough and was a bit angry with myself so got my head down and really went for it. I ran wide once, can’t remember where, but really went for it on the last lap. I was trying really hard but my board was still saying either ‘+1’ or ‘-1’ although I’d worked out it was Cameron who I must have been dicing with. I got a glimpse of him a few times so used him as a gauge and I just managed to squeeze home.

It was another frustrating day for Guy Martin with fifth place in the evening’s 4-lap Royal London 360 Superstock race his only finish of the day. Forced to make a tyre change at the solitary pitstop (when no one else did), getting onto the podium was always going to be a tall order for the Tyco Suzuki rider and although the search for a first ever TT win continues, it did go some way to making up for retirement in the earlier Supersport race where he was forced to retire with a fuel pump problem at the end of lap one.

I wasn’t quite sure what the problem was or how bad it was going to be until Cameron Donald came past me in the Supersport race and I just couldn’t hang onto him,” said MartinThe bike just wouldn’t hold the revs, but that’s the TT – the smallest of problems can cost you any chance of a podium. In the Superstock race I was in the hunt for a podium in the opening laps and had a good steady run, but we just weren’t good enough today for the win. The boys did a great pit stop for me and the new rubber helped, but it just wasn’t enough at the end. We get another go on Wednesday in the second Supersport race and then on Friday in the Senior so I’m still hopeful of nailing that first win.

Conor Cummins again had to watch from the sidelines and, if he’s to race at TT2012, it’s likely it will just be in Friday’s Senior race. The Manxman continues to put a brave face on his dilemma but it’s no doubt the pain he’s feeling from not racing is a lot greater than the pain in his injured right hand.

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DAINESE SUPERBIKE TT RACE REPORT

03 Juni 2012 | News

by Phil Wain

La parola leggenda di solito è troppo usata, esagerata ed enfatizzata. Ma nel caso di John McGuinness, è una parola totalmente appropriata. Il pilota della Honda TT Legends ha dimostrato di appartenere a una categoria a sé stante, vincendo sabato nei 6 giri della competizione nella classe Superbike nell’ambito delle gare del Tourist Trophy nell'Isola di Man. Si tratta della sua diciottesima vittoria e del trentaquattresimo podio TT in totale. Dopo aver vinto all’inizio la sfida con l’australiano Cameron Donald, McGuinness si è guadagnato il primo posto nel secondo giro e non si è più guardato indietro.

Fu nel 1999 che il pilota di Morecambe vinse la TT per la prima volta, ma pochi si sarebbero aspettati che ne vincesse 18, un totale che potrebbe ancora salire nei prossimi giorni. McGuinness analizza il proprio stile di guida e nonostante non incarni lo stereotipo di pilota moderno (allenarsi e mangiare sano non si adattano al suo stile!), la sua esperienza non ha rivali. Adora l’Isola di Man, non solo per le gare ma anche per la storia e l’isola stessa, ed è in grado di inserire una marcia in più quando gli avversari sono già al limite. Pur emergendo fra gli altri, McGuinness è anche modesto, il preferito dei fan, uno che rimane umile oggi esattamente come quando ha vinto la sua prima gara tanti anni fa.

È una bella sensazione” ha detto McGuinness, sostenuto dall’asso della Formula uno Mark Webber.Ho vinto alcune volte da queste parti in passato e, ad essere onesti, non so mai cosa dire e non mi dispiace essere ancora al primo posto, si è trattato solo di me, del circuito e del cronometro. Come prima cosa c’erano molte foglie sul percorso e io ero un po’esitante al primo giro, stavo cercando di trovare la mia andatura in gara. In seguito le condizioni sono migliorate e mi sono sentito più forte, quindi ho solo letto i miei tempi quando ho raggiunto il primo posto.

All’inizio Cameron aveva preso il ritmo giusto, quindi dopo due fantastici pit stop, ho fatto degli ottimi terzo e quinto giro, toccando tutti i miei massimi e concentrandomi molto. C’era molta folla e io ero emozionato quando ho superato Creg all’ultimo giro poiché mi ha ricordato come salutavo Joey (Dunlop) tanti anni fa!

Anche Guy Martin era competitivo all’inizio, dopo aver eseguito un perfetto giro d‘apertura a 210 km/h. Il pilota della Tyco Suzuki era solo staccato di una manciata di secondi alla fine del secondo giro e si trovava in terza posizione quando ha fatto il primo pit stop. Tuttavia, nonostante il cambio dello pneumatico posteriore, ci sono stati problemi con il perno della ruota posteriore, per cui non è stato in grado di cambiare lo pneumatico al secondo pit stop (fine del quarto giro) e quindi ha fatto i quattro giri finali con lo stesso pneumatico.

Invece di ritirarsi, Guy è andato coraggiosamente avanti, ma non è riuscito a trattenere Bruce Anstey per il terzo posto. Si è guadagnato il quarto, accumulando delle importanti informazioni per il TT Senior di venerdì.

Più tardi, un saggio Guy ha dichiarato: “Nei primi due giri non ho avuto dei problemi reali di cui valga la pena parlare, ma dopo il pit stop abbiamo avuto dei piccoli contrattempi che ci hanno fatto scendere al ritmo di John e Cameron. Quando il perno posteriore ha provocato un problema non avevamo più la possibilità di vincere e ho continuato solo per finire. In generale il rendimento e la manovrabilità della moto sono stati ottimi. So di poter essere veloce, come abbiamo dimostrato al primo giro e che la squadra è in grado di affrontare la cosa, quindi abbiamo ancora un’occasione nella Senior. Siamo venuti qui ben preparati, ma non si possono fare le prove per il TT e può succedere di tutto.

Il suo compagno di scuderia Conor Cummins non è stato schierato nella prima gara del Tourist Trophy della settimana per ragioni di sicurezza dopo una consultazione tra il pilota di casa, il manager della squadra Philip Neill e il personale sanitario della Scott physiotherapy . Nonostante si sia allenato per quattro giorni, la lesione alla mano che Conor ha subito durante la North West 200 gli sta ancora causando dei disagi considerevoli e sarà riesaminata prima della Supersport e della Superstock di lunedì.

La decisione è stata quella corretta. Ovviamente sono abbattuto, ma si tratta solo di dare del tempo alla mano. Ho notato il cambiamento dopo un solo giorno e questo è servito a far scendere il gonfiore e i lividi sono molto diminuiti. Grazie ai ragazzi della squadra per l’aiuto e al mio Medico e al team di Isla Scott. Altre sessioni di camera iperbarica e tanto riposo, faranno il resto.

Comunque, la sua partecipazione al resto della settimana è ancora in dubbio e, se ci sarà, sarà ovvio che non potrà correre al massimo del suo potenziale. È una crudele sfortuna che con una squadra e un’opportunità così grandi, sia rimasto fuori senza averne colpa. Ma non è ancora finita e non sorprendetevi se Conor riprende la sua posizione di partenza lunedì.

by Phil Wain

The word legend is often over used, over exaggerated and over emphasised. But in John McGuinness’ case, it’s a word totally befitting of the man. The Honda TT Legends rider was again in a class of his own as he won Saturday’s 6-lap Superbike race at the Isle of Man TT Races. It was his 18th win and 34th TT podium in total. Overcoming an early challenge from Australian Cameron Donald, McGuinness seized the lead on the second lap and never looked back.

It was back in 1999 when the Morecambe rider first won at the TT but few would ever have expected him to go on to win 18, a total that could well increase during the next few days. McGuinness thinks about his racing and although he doesn’t fit the modern stereotype racer (training and eating the right things don’t fit into his regime!), his experience his second to none. He loves the Isle of Man, not just the racing but also the history and the island itself, and he’s able to move into top gear when his rivals are already there. A class act, McGuinness is also modest, a fans’ favourite who remains as humble today as what he was when he won his first race all those years ago.

This feels pretty special,” said McGuinness, who was supported by Formula One ace Mark Webber. “I’ve won a few around here in the past and, to be honest, I never know what to say and going off at number one again, it was just me, the track and the stopwatch. There were a lot of leaves on the track first thing and I was a bit tentative on the first lap, just feeling my way into the race. After that though, conditions were good and I felt strong everywhere, so I just read my boards once I’d got the lead.

Cameron was really on it to begin with it so, after two fantastic pit stops, I had a real good go on laps three and five, hitting all my apexes and concentrating really hard. There was a big crowd out there and I got a bit emotional when I went through the Creg on the last lap as it reminded me of how I used to wave at Joey (Dunlop) all those years ago!

Guy Martin was also in contention in the early stages after producing a standing start opening lap of 130mph. The Tyco Suzuki rider was only a handful of seconds adrift at the end of the first two laps and was lying in third place when he came in for his first pit stop. However, although the rear tyre was changed, problems with the rear wheel spindle meant he was unable to do the same at the second pit stop (at the end of the fourth lap) and so completed the final four laps on the same tyre.

Instead of retiring, Guy valiantly carried on but was unable to hold off Bruce Anstey for third place. He eventually took fourth place, also accumulating vital information for Friday’s Senior TT.

Speaking later, a philosophical Guy said; “On those first two laps we’d no real problems worth mentioning but after the pit stop we had a couple of small issues that dropped us off John and Cameron’s pace. By the time the rear wheel spindle caused a problem we were out of the race for the win and I just rode it to the finish. The general handling and performance of the bike was very good. I know I can do the speeds, as we proved on that first lap and the team can do the business, so we’re still in with a chance in the Senior. We’ve come here well prepared, but you can’t test for the TT and anything can happen.

His team-mate Conor Cummins was withdrawn from the first race of TT week on safety grounds after consultation between the Manx rider, team manager Philip Neill and the Scott physiotherapy team. Despite practicing for four days, the hand injury Conor sustained at the North West 200 is still causing him considerable discomfort and will be re-assessed prior to Monday’s Supersport and Superstock races.

It was the correct decision. I’m obviously gutted but it’s all about giving the hand time. I’ve noticed the change in just one day and it has helped the swelling to go down and the bruising is a lot less. Thanks to the boys in the team for their help and to my Doctor and Isla Scott’s team. Some more Hyperbaric chamber visits and plenty of rest should do the trick.

However, his participation in the remainder of the week must be in doubt and, if he does, it’s clear he won’t be able to ride at his full potential. It’s cruel misfortune that, with such a great team and opportunity, he’s been left on the sidelines through no fault of his own. It’s not over yet though so don’t be surprised if Conor does take his starting slot on Monday.

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